Eddie August Schneider (Q5335826)

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American aviator (1911-1940)
  • Eddie August Henry Schneider
  • Eddie A. H. Schneider
  • Eddie A. Schneider
  • Eddie Schneider
  • Eddie August Schneider
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English
Eddie August Schneider
American aviator (1911-1940)
  • Eddie August Henry Schneider
  • Eddie A. H. Schneider
  • Eddie A. Schneider
  • Eddie Schneider
  • Eddie August Schneider

Statements

Eddie August Schneider (1911-1940) on September 10, 1930 (English)
10 September 1930
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Eddie August Henry Schneider (English)
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20 October 1911Gregorian
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"Local Pilot Killed. Eddie Schneider and Passenger Die in Crash. Eddie A. Schneider, 29, veteran pilot and former holder of the junior transcontinental speed record for airplanes, was instantly killed yesterday afternoon when a small monoplane in which he was giving a refresher course to another pilot was struck by U.S. Naval Reserve plane at Floyd Bennett Airport, Brooklyn." (English)
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Eddie A. Schneider Weds Woman Flyer. New York City, New York; June 26, 1934 (Associated Press) Eddie A. Schneider, 22 years old, an aviator, and Gretchen A. Hahnen, 33, New Jersey governor of the Women's International Aeronautics Association, were married in the Municipal Chapel June 2, a search of the records today disclosed. Four years ago Schneider, then 18, clipped an hour and a half from the late Frank Goldsborough's junior record of twenty-eight hours and eighteen minutes for a west-east transcontinental flight. (English)
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Eddie A. Schneider, 22 years old, an aviator, and Gretchen A. Hahnen, 33, New Jersey governor of the Women's International Aeronautics Association, were married in the Municipal Chapel June 2, a search of the records today disclosed. Four years ago Schneider, then 18, clipped an hour and a half from the late Frank Goldsborough's junior record of twenty-eight hours and eighteen minutes for a west-east transcontinental flight. (English)
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"Eddie A. Schneider, 29, veteran pilot and former holder of the junior transcontinental speed record for airplanes, was instantly killed yesterday afternoon when a small monoplane in which he was giving a refresher course to another pilot was struck by U.S. Naval Reserve plane at Floyd Bennett Airport, Brooklyn." (English)
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Eddie Schneider, who started flying when he was 15 years old and set a junior transcontinental record in 1930 at the age of 18, was killed with a student passenger yesterday when their light training plane was in collision with a Naval Reserve plane, also on a training flight, just west of Floyd Bennett Field. ... (English)
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Following funeral services to-night in Jersey City, interment services will be held tomorrow afternoon at Fairview Cemetery, Fairview, for Eddie A. Schneider, Jersey City aviator, who was instantly, killed Monday afternoon in a midair collision over Floyd Bennett Airport, Brooklyn. A plane, piloted, by Schneider, was struck by a Naval Reserve plane as the two ships were at an altitude of 600 feet, both coming in for a landing. (English)
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The marriage of Miss Gretchen Hahnen, New Jersey governor of the Women's Aeronautic Association, of 208 Sip Avenue, to Eddie A. Schneider, Jersey City aviator, whose home is 58 Van Ripen Avenue, was announced at the informal reception Saturday evening. The couple were married Saturday, June 2 in the New York Municipal Building. (English)
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Eddie A. Schneider, 22, an aviator, and Gretchen A. Hahnen, 33, New Jersey governor of the Women's International Aeronautics association, were married in the municipal chapel June 2, a search of the records Monday disclosed. In applying for the license, Schneider said he was a salesman. (English)
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Schneider, 28, slim and quiet, is chief pilot and field manager at the new Delawanna Airport. He still lives In Jersey City but intends to move to Clifton. He has been flying for more then ten years and he has 1,100 hours in the air to his credit. He first became interested In aviation when he took a plane hop while on a visit to Germany. When he returned to America, he chucked his bank job and worked his way into Roosevelt Field, where he toiled as a mechanic. He holds a transport pilot's license and a mechanic's licence. It is within his jurisdiction to ground any plane for a structural or mechanical defect and he has Department of Commerce authority to approve for flight any plane that had undergone a major repair job. Schneider was seventeen when he bought his own plane, a Spartan. In 1929 [sic] he won the junior transcontinental race from New York to Los Angeles and return in another of his planed, a Cessna he made the Western flight in 21 hour elapsed time, despite the fact that he scraped a tree top in Pennsylvania and had to put in for repairs and then ran into a mild cyclone out West. His return flight was made on a two-stop schedule and his elapsed time made him an easy winner. (English)
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Eddie Schneider, New York, who, tho only nineteen years old has made much aviation history and is a veteran pilot Eddie came to Lincoln Tuesday with the national air tour. A week and a half ago in last place due to an accident in the Virginia mountains. Eddie had overtaken all but four of the planes contesting for the Edsel B. Ford trophy when the tour arrived in Lincoln. While flying over the Virginia mountains, the propeller of his Cessna monoplane broke. Picking a small plateau in the hills, he brought the plane down to a comparatively good landing. The motor was torn loose and was damaged. It was necessary for Eddie and his mechanic to install several new cylinders and make other repairs before he could continue, in the race. With the repairs made, Eddie started out, two complete days behind the other contestants, Besides the loss of these two legs, he also received a penalty for making the repairs and replacing the cylinders. Despite this, he caught up with the other airmen in Texas and at this writing appears to be 'in the money.' Eddie had to pay all his own expenses on the trip. His only chance to break even is to win one or several offered prizes. When he left Lincoln, he was full of confidence of placing among the first few. Two years ago, Eddie set a junior transcontinental record in his Cessna, and last year he won the light plane class in the national air tour. He learned to fly when sixteen years old, at old Roosevelt field in New York. (English)
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A forced landing in Newark Bay left Eddie Schneider, lessee of the Jersey City airport and former junior cross country flying champion, and Fred Weigel, wet and chilled but otherwise unharmed. Schneider took aloft a biplane late yesterday to give instruction to Weigel, a student pilot. The ship was about 150 feet In the air when something went wrong. Schneider brought It down on the water about 150 feet from abort. Someone at the airport the police and the fliers were rescued by the emergency squad. The plane was submerged in ten feet of water. (English)
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The first attempt to circle the globe by airplane from West to East is likely to be made by Eddie Schneider, 18-year-old Jersey City aviator, to carry the name of Jersey City to every part of the world. The Chamber of Commerce today approved the flight and suggested that Jersey City appropriate $25,000 to finance the flight in the interest of advertising the city and increasing the air-mindedness of Jersey City residents. The flight is projected to start from Jersey City Airport and to include a non-stop trip to Paris. Young Schneider has been planning the flight all Winter and has every detail worked out. He is now only awaiting approval of Mayor Hague and the City Commission to go ahead with his preparations. According to Schneider's plans. he will leave Jersey City in June with a light load of gas, filling up at another airport where facilities for taking off with a heavy load are better. His course, as planned, will be for a non-stop flight to Paris. from there to Berlin, and then to Moscow. After leaving Moscow. he will stop at Omsk, Irkutsk, Chita, Khabarorsk, Petrotavaborsk and Kamchatka, all in Siberia. From Siberia he will fly to Seward, Alaska, and thence to Seattle, Washington, from where he expects to make a non-stop flight to Jersey City. His route will be one of the most difficult yet tried by an aviator, although it is the best, so far as can be judged, for the west-east course. (English)
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Eddie Schneider, youthful Jersey City pilot, attempting to set a new junior trans-continental East-to-West flight record, was awaiting weather reports at his hotel here today before resuming his trip. ... The boy is no inexperienced flyer despite the fact that he has been flying only two years. He has had more than 300 hours in the air of which 38 were at night. He left Dickinson High School after having completed his sophomore year to study aviation at the Westfield Airport and has made such progress since that he is considered one of the best junior aviators in the country. He is flying a Cessna monoplane equipped with a Warner Scarab motor having 110-horsepower with a top speed of 132 miles an hour. (English)
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Eddie Schneider, 18, of 111 Carlton Avenue, will attempt a non-stop solo flight to the Pacific coast next month, determined to break the national junior transcontinental airplane speed record set by the late Frank Goldsborough, ill fated flier. Eddie left Dickinson High School two years ago and studied aviation at the Roosevelt Flying Field School. He was distinguished as the youngest flier to receive a limited commercial pilot's license and a transport license, after attending the Atlantic Air College at Westfield. He now has 275 air hours, and 38 hours of night flying to his credit, and, in spite of his youth, is considered one of the best young fliers in the East. ... Schneider first became enthusiastic about aviation when he flew from Hanover to Hamburg while on a visit to Germany. On his return, his interest was centered on aviation to the exclusion of all else. So great was this preoccupation, his parents said. that he took no interest in girls, as is usual for a boy his age, or the drinking parties which some youths without a goal seem to need to furnish excitement. (English)
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The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D. C., has established a niche to memorialize the late Eddie Schneider, former Jersey City resident who was once the nation's youngest aviation record holder, it was learned today. Mrs. Gretchen Schneider Black, the flier's widow, says an aviation library which the couple compiled before his death in a plane crash in 1940 has been 'gratefully accepted' by the institution, which will display it in the National Air Museum as the Eddie Schneider Memorial Library. A collection of Schneider's scrapbooks, mementos and licenses, including his international flying license, signed by Orville Wright, is also a permanent exhibit at the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences in New York. ... Employed by various airlines following his return to this country, Schneider was an instructor for a flying service when he met his death December 23, 1940, at the age of 29. A student pilot with him also was killed when their light plane was in a mid-air collision over Floyd Bennett Airport, Brooklyn with a naval reserve plane. The late pilot's wife, who is the former Gretchen Hahnen of Jersey City, was at one time director of the Aviation Club of The Jersey Journal's Junior Club Magazine. She also held the post of New Jersey governor of the Women's Aeronautic Association. Mrs. Schneider Black is now a resident of Fort Worth, Texas. (English)
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Flier Says Lawyer Sent Him To Spain. Schneider Names New Yorker as Giving Him Ticket to Join Loyalist Army. Promised $1,500 a Month. But He Was Never Paid, So He Quit, Witness Declares. Tells Story to U.S. Officials. ... (English)
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The "Nearest to Manhattan" airport is to be dedicated tomorrow and will be turned over by the City Fathers to Eddie A. Schneider, Jersey City pilot, lessee of the property. (English)
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Eddie Schneider was born October 20, 1911 on Second Avenue, and 17th Street in New York City. Later his family moved to Red Bank, New Jersey where he attended grade school. From there his family moved to Jersey City, New Jersey and he graduated from Dickinson High School. In 1928 his mother passed away and his father took him, and his sister, for a visit to Germany and Norway to visit relatives. It was in Germany that he had his first airplane flight and it was then the 'bug' bit him. Eddie received his flying instructions at Roosevelt Field in 1928. In October 1929 he received his commercial pilot's license and so became the youngest commercial pilot in the United States at age eighteen. He also received in that year, his aircraft and engine mechanic's license and so again he became the youngest licensed aircraft mechanic. In August 1930 he succeeded in breaking Frank Goldsborough's Junior Transcontinental record from New York to Los Angeles in 29 hours and 55 minutes, lowering the previous record by 4 hours and 22 minutes. He made the return trip in 27 hours and 19 minutes, lowering the previous record by 1 hour and 36 minutes. His total time for the round trip was 57 hours and 14 minutes, thus breaking the preceding record for the round trip, which was 62 hours and 58 minutes. ... (English)
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Back from a month of dropping bombs on behalf of the Spanish loyalist government, Eddie Schneider, Jersey City, N. J., aviator, said Friday he was signed up by a New York lawyer to serve in the Spanish war at $1,500 a month. Assistant United States Attorney John F. Dailey, Jr., announced he would seek indictments from the federal grand jury next week against several New Yorkers in connection with the enlistment of American aviators for Spanish service. Schneider said the lawyer negotiated with him for his services and handed him his steamship ticket for transportation to Spain. The flier said he quit to comply with President Roosevelt's neutrality policy and that the Spanish embassy in Paris advanced him his fare home pending payment of salary. Schneider said he participated in daily bombing raids in Spain for three weeks. ... (English)
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Back from a month of dropping bombs on behalf of the Spanish loyalist government, Eddie Schneider, Jersey City, N. J., aviator, said Friday he was signed up by a New York lawyer to serve in the Spanish war at $1,500 a month. Assistant United States Attorney John F. Dailey, Jr., announced he would seek indictments from the federal grand jury next week against several New Yorkers in connection with the enlistment of American aviators for Spanish service. Schneider said the lawyer negotiated with him for his services and handed him his steamship ticket for transportation to Spain. The flier said he quit to comply with President Roosevelt's neutrality policy and that the Spanish embassy in Paris advanced him his fare home pending payment of salary. Schneider said he participated in daily bombing raids in Spain for three weeks. ... (English)
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... The books are cataloged and now known as the "Eddie Schneider Memorial Library" and I am happy about that. When I came back to Fort Worth from New York in 1948, I gave all of Eddie's scrap books, international license signed by Orville Wright and other licenses to the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences in New York. ... (English)
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Famous Flyers Enter Air Tour. Two famous flyers who will compete in the National Air Tour starting from Detroit July 1, are Eddie Schneider, left, 19-year-old former holder of the junior transcontinental flight record, and Mae Haizlip, right, the only woman to enter the reliability race over the 6,500-mile course for a second time. She first entered in 1929. (English)
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Eddie Schneider, young Jersey City flier, by clever handling of his light biplane averted what might have been a serious accident at the National Air Races at Chicago, yesterday. According to officials of the Curtiss-Reynolds Airport, Schneider took his plane into a dive for the ground to avoid a collision with a 20-passenger Burnelli transport plane and then pulled clear of the grandstand after the 40-foot left wing of the huge Burnelli had scraped the wing of his plane, Schneider and Don Mockler, of the Richfield Oil Corporation, were taking off for the balloon races at Cleveland and were just over the south grandstand when Mockler saw the crowd scattering below them. As a result of the "wing-scraping," Vincent Burnelli, airplane inventor, has been grounded for the duration of the meet, and the Department of Commerce has ordered his pilot not to fly for three months. (English)
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Four disillusioned American aviators announced today they were through with Spain and, furthermore, they were through with civil wars. The quadrumvirate - Bert Acosta, Frederick Lord, Gordon Berry and Eddie Schneider — had led the Spanish Socialist government's "Yankee Squadron" on the Basque front in the far North. But, they said, they were not paid, and money was their only reason for joining up. The venture, said Schneider, "was purely business." They quit Spain after six weeks in the mountainous War zone of the age of the Basque Pyrenees and returned here proclaiming and intention to hurry back to America as fast as possible. Schneider told the European edition of the New York Herald Tribune "we quit because the Spanish government owes us $1,100." The flyers also protested they were given nothing except unarmed sports planes with which to fight, while Russian pilots were assigned "regular American army planes." The American war planes were said to be machines built in Russia through contracts giving the Soviet government permission to copy American models. The flyers said both the Socialists and Fascists air forces in Spain were staffed almost entirely by foreigners. The government, they added, seemed to be outnumbered in men and equipment everywhere, particularly in their sector. Acosta and Berry were to sail for New York where they left for the war November 11. Their companions made arrangements to follow shortly. (English)
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"2 Die As Planes Crash At Field. Eddie Schneider, Who Flew At 15, Is Killed When His Craft And Navy Trainer Collide. Passenger Also Victim. U.S. Ship Is Landed Safely At Floyd Bennett Airport Despite Damaged Wings." (English)
Eddie August Schneider
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Eddie August Schneider
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