stoicism (Q48235)

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school of Hellenistic philosophy who held that the practice of virtue suffices to attain eudaimonia
  • the porch
  • stoics
  • Stoa
Language Label Description Also known as
English
stoicism
school of Hellenistic philosophy who held that the practice of virtue suffices to attain eudaimonia
  • the porch
  • stoics
  • Stoa

Statements

3. century BCE
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To bring our mind into this state of agreement
living in agreement with nature
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4. Ethics / 4.1 The Telos / 4.2 Virtue / To bring our mind into this state of agreement and achieve the telos, ... (English)
living in agreement with nature
4. Ethics / 4.3 Indifferents / Recall that the telos is standardly specified as “living in agreement with nature”. (English)
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4. Ethics / 4.3 Indifferents / Stoics maintain that such items are neither good nor bad and, thus, “indifferent” (adiaphora / indifferentia) to human happiness. (English)
3. The Third Topos: Ethics / However, Stoic ethics actually attempts to strike a balance between the asceticism of the Cynics and the somewhat elitist views of the Peripatetics. It does so through the introduction of the wholly (controversial) Stoic concept of preferred and dispreferred “indifferents” briefly mentioned at the beginning. (English)
eudaimonic life
a life spent practicing the cardinal virtues
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eudaimonic life
2. The First Two Topoi / Stoicism was a practical philosophy, the chief goal of which was to help people live a eudaimonic life, which the Stoics identified with a life spent practicing the cardinal virtues (next section). (English)
affinity
appropriation
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affinity
appropriation
3. The Third Topos: Ethics / Tightly related to this idea of following (human) nature was the Stoic concept of oikeiôsis, often translated as affinity, or appropriation. (English)
four cardinal virtues
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four cardinal virtues
3. The Third Topos: Ethics / The Stoics related these propensities directly to the four cardinal virtues of temperance, courage, justice and practical wisdom. (English)
endure and renounce
endure [what the universe throws your way] and renounce [what the universe does not allow]
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This is a version of what Nietzsche eventually called amor fati (love your fate), and that is encapsulated in Epictetus’ phrase “endure [what the universe throws your way] and renounce [what the universe does not allow]” (Fragments 10). (English)
endure [what the universe throws your way] and renounce [what the universe does not allow]
endure and renounce
ruling faculty
executive function of the brain
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executive function of the brain
ruling faculty
The Stoics realized that we have automatic responses that are not under our control, and that is why they focused on what is under our control: the judgment rendered on the likely causes of our instinctive reactions, a judgment rendered by what Marcus Aurelius called the ruling faculty (in modern cognitive science terminology: the executive function of the brain). (English)
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physics (phusikê)
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1.2 Systematicity / Stoic philosophy was, from Zeno onwards, conceived of as comprising three parts: physics (phusikê), logic (logikê), and ethics (êthikê). (English)
logic (logikê)
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1.2 Systematicity / Stoic philosophy was, from Zeno onwards, conceived of as comprising three parts: physics (phusikê), logic (logikê), and ethics (êthikê). (English)
ethics (êthikê)
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1.2 Systematicity / Stoic philosophy was, from Zeno onwards, conceived of as comprising three parts: physics (phusikê), logic (logikê), and ethics (êthikê). (English)
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Nature and scope of Stoicism / Its chief competitors in antiquity were: (1) Epicureanism, with its doctrine of a life of withdrawalin contemplation and escape from worldly affairs and its belief thatpleasure, as the absence of pain, is the goal of humans; (English)
Epicureans
... it engaged in vigorous debates with the Skeptics, the Academics, and the Epicureans. (English)
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Its chief competitors in antiquity were: ... (3)Christianity <https://www.britannica.com/>, with its hope of personal salvation <https://www.britannica.com/> provided by an appeal to faith<https://www.britannica.com/> as an immanent aid to human understanding and by the beneficent intervention of a merciful God. (English)
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Its chief competitors in antiquity were: ... (2) Skepticism<https://www.britannica.com/>, which rejected certain knowledge in favour of local beliefs and customs, in the expectation that those guides would provide the quietude and serenity that the dogmatic philosopher (e.g., the Stoic) could not hope to achieve; ... (English)
Skeptics
... it engaged in vigorous debates with the Skeptics, the Academics, and the Epicureans. (English)
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Academic-Skeptic
3. The Third Topos: Ethics ... defend them from critiques from both Epicurean and especially Academic-Skeptic quarters. (English)
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Stoicism
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Identifiers

ストア学派
ストア哲学
ストア派
Stoics
Broader Term(s)skos:broader 古代哲学
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188
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Philosophy. Psychology. Religion--Philosophy (General)--Ancient (600 B.C.-430 A.D.)--Occident--Greco-Roman philosophy--Stoicism
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Best Stoicism Posts - Reddit (American English)
1 November 2022
Stoicism
First published Fri Jan 20, 2023 [Editor’s Note: The following new entry replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.]
Marion Durand
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05985815-n
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