Wikidata:WikiProject Cultural venues/Data structure

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Check out the following WikiProject page for all the data modelling issues: [[1]]

Example Items[edit]

Schauspielhaus Zürich[edit]

Main Venue: Schauspielhaus Zürich (Q675022), with its main stage:

Carnegie Hall[edit]

Main Venue: Carnegie Hall (Q200959), with its various parts:

Information about Carnegie Hall to be ingested (the texts have been released under CC-0)[edit]

Same cultural venue, changing names over time:

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/1/about

Weill Recital Hall is the 268-seat auditorium located on the third level of Carnegie Hall, adjacent to Isaac Stern Auditorium / Ronald O. Perelman Stage. When Carnegie Hall opened in 1891 it was known as Chamber Music Hall, and was renamed Carnegie Recital Hall in 1947. In 1987 it was renamed Weill Recital Hall in recognition of Carnegie Hall Chairman Sanford I. Weill and his wife, Joan.

gn:historicalName      Carnegie Recital Hall

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/94042/about

Carnegie Recital Hall was the name for the small auditorium located on the third floor of Carnegie Hall between 1947 and 1987. From 1891 to 1947 it was known as Chamber Music Hall, and in 1987 it was renamed Weill Recital Hall in recognition of Carnegie Hall Chairman Sanford I. Weill and his wife, Joan.

gn:historicalName      Chamber Music Hall

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/2/about

Chamber Music Hall was the original name for the small auditorium located on the third floor of Carnegie Hall. It was renamed Carnegie Recital Hall in 1947, and in 1987 renamed Weill Recital Hall in recognition of Carnegie Hall Chairman Sanford I. Weill and his wife, Joan.

Same cultural venue, changing names over time:

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/5/about

Main Hall is the designation applied to the main Carnegie Hall auditorium from 1891-1997, when it was renamed Isaac Stern Auditorium in honor of violinist Isaac Stern, President of Carnegie Hall (1660-2001). In 2006 the stage was dedicated the Ronald O. Perelman Stage.

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/94684/about

Isaac Stern Auditorium / Ronald O. Perelman Stage is the main performance venue at Carnegie Hall, seating 2,804. From 1891-1997 it did not have a particular designation, so for purposes of clarity the auditorium during this period is referred to as Main Hall. In 1997 it was renamed Isaac Stern Auditorium in honor of violinist Isaac Stern, President of Carnegie Hall (1660-2001). In 2006 the stage was dedicated the Ronald O. Perelman Stage.

gn:historicalName      Main Hall

Same space, important transformations giving way to different cultural venues

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/65521/about

Zankel Hall, the newest of Carnegie Hall’s three auditoriums, occupies a space that had previously undergone several transformations. Underneath the main hall, the original version of the space was the 1,200 seat Recital Hall. In 1896, the venue was reconfigured as the 800-seat Carnegie Lyceum. It became an off-Broadway theater called Carnegie Playhouse in 1956, and in 1961 was converted to an art film movie house called Carnegie Cinema. The venue was completely rebuilt between 1999 and 2003, when it reopened as the 599-seat Zankel Hall, named in honor of Carnegie Hall Vice Chairman Arthur Zankel and his wife, Judy.

gn:historicalName      Carnegie Hall Cinema

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/103090/about

Carnegie Hall Cinema was a movie theater that existed on the lower level of Carnegie Hall from 1961-1997. Earlier incarnations of the venue include the original 1200-seat Recital Hall (1891-1896), the 800-seat Carnegie Lyceum (1896-1956), and the off-Broadway theater Carnegie Playhouse (1956-1961). It was completely rebuilt between 1999 and 2003, when it reopened as the 599-seat Zankel Hall, named in honor of Carnegie Hall Vice Chairman Arthur Zankel and his wife, Judy.

gn:historicalName      Carnegie Hall Playhouse

http://www.w3.org/2004/02/skos/core#exactMatch http://sws.geonames.org/7255414/

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/94041/about

Carnegie Hall Playhouse was a 299-seat off-Broadway theater (occasionally referred to in print simply as ‟Carnegie Playhouse”) that existed on the lower level of Carnegie Hall from 1956-1961, which replaced Carnegie Lyceum (1896-1956), which itself replaced the original venue known as Recital Hall (1891-1896). In 1961 the venue was converted to an art film movie house called Carnegie Cinema. It was completely rebuilt between 1999 and 2003, when it reopened as the 599-seat Zankel Hall, named in honor of Carnegie Hall Vice Chairman Arthur Zankel and his wife, Judy.

gn:historicalName      Carnegie Lyceum

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/9/about

Carnegie Lyceum was an 800-seat theatrical and recital venue on the lower level of Carnegie Hall, which operated from 1896-1956, replacing the original 1200-seat Recital Hall. It became an off-Broadway theater called Carnegie Playhouse in 1956, and in 1961 was converted to an art film movie house called Carnegie Hall Cinema. The venue was completely rebuilt between 1999 and 2003, when it reopened as the 599-seat Zankel Hall, named in honor of Carnegie Hall Vice Chairman Arthur Zankel and his wife, Judy.

gn:historicalName      Recital Hall

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/94043/about

Recital Hall was a 1200-seat auditorium on the lower level of Carnegie Hall that was the first venue in the building to begin operations when the hall opened in 1891. In 1896, the venue was reconfigured as the 800-seat Carnegie Lyceum. It became an off-Broadway theater called Carnegie Playhouse in 1956, and in 1961 was converted to an art film movie house called Carnegie Hall Cinema. The venue was completely rebuilt between 1999 and 2003, when it reopened as the 599-seat Zankel Hall, named in honor of Carnegie Hall Vice Chairman Arthur Zankel and his wife, Judy.

Former venues, no longer in existence

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/6/about

Kaplan Space was a small venue, located directly above Weill Recital Hall that replaced the Chapter Hall in 1984. It was named in honor of the grant from the J.M. Kaplan Fund that funded the redesign. The Kaplan Space was used as a venue for educational and children's events and as a rehearsal space until 2010, when it was demolished as part of Carnegie Hall's Studio Towers Renovation Project, which created new spaces dedicated to the educational programs of Carnegie Hall's Weill Music Institute.

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/3/about

Chapter Hall was a small auditorium, seating approximately 200, located directly above Carnegie Chamber Music Hall (later renamed Carnegie Recital Hall and then Weill Recital Hall). It was used for rehearsals, small events such as recitals, children's theater, and poetry readings, and civic and community meetings and religious services.

Minor venues

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/98571/about

Medium Ensemble Room 10-A

rdfs:comment     Sussman Ensemble Room

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/98573/about

Weill Music Room

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/98578/about

Piano Studio 11M-B

rdfs:comment     Bulgari Piano Studio

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/98577/about

Medium Ensemble Room 11M-A

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/105422/about

Studio 855: Located on 8th floor of 57th Street side of building, where Weill Music Institute offices are now located (2016).

Informal venues

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/96621/about

The Rohatyn Room is a banquet space located just off the First Tier of Stern/Perelman, next to the Rose Museum. It is open for early walk-in and intermission bar service during select Stern/Perelman concerts. The space, originally called East Room, was created when the Carnegie Hall Tower was built in 1991. The name was changed as of 12/5/1996.

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/96623/about

Carnegie Hall Sidewalk: Several events have taken place on the sidewalks directly in front of Carnegie Hall, along 57th Street, or in front of the Zankel Hall entrance on 56th street; this entry is used to record the location for those events.

Same place, with changing functions over time

http://data.carnegiehall.org/venues/98753/about

Cafe Carnegie: This space began as a dining room, coat room, and multi-purpose patron amenities space when Carnegie Hall opened in 1891. It became the Carnegie Hall Art Gallery, an exhibition space for artists who were tenants in the Carnegie Hall studios, in 1932. In 1947 it was remodeled as a cocktail lounge and renamed Café Carnegie. It was restored to its original configuration in 1991, and renamed Travelers Group Café. The name changed to Citigroup Café after the merger of Citibank and Travelers Group in 1998; eventually the name was shortened to Citi Café.

Data structure for venues[edit]

By definition, a venue is defined as a "place where a public event or a meeting happens" (see https://dictionary.cambridge.org/de/worterbuch/englisch/venue). Further a venue is always a place which is created by humans.

Properties for performing art venues[edit]

The following table presents a proposition how to structure the data for venues of performing arts.

General[edit]

Title ID Data type Description Examples Inverse
instance ofP31Iteminstance of: that class of which this subject is a particular example and member (subject typically an individual member with a proper name label); different from P279; using this property as a qualifier is deprecated—use P2868 or P3831 insteadGrand Théâtre de Québec <instance of> venue-
named afterP138Itemeponym and memorial society: entity or event that inspired the subject's name, or namesake (in at least one language)The Steve Allen Playhouse <named after> Steve Allen-
date of official openingP1619Point in timeopening ceremony and opening: date or point in time an event, museum, theater etc. officially openedKing's Hall, Herne Bay <date of official opening> 4 April 1904date of official closure
official websiteP856URLofficial website and home page: URL of the official homepage of an item (current or former) [if the homepage changes, add an additional statement with preferred rank. Do not remove the former URL]Tolhuisgarden <official website> http://tolhuistuin.nl-

Location[edit]

Title ID Data type Description Examples Inverse
located in the administrative territorial entityP131Itemadministrative territorial entity: the item is located on the territory of the following administrative entity. Use P276 (location) for specifying locations that are non-administrative places and for items about eventsMagnet Theater <located in the administrative territorial entity> Manhattan-
located on streetP669Itemstreet: street, road, or square, where the item is located. To add the number, use Property:P670 "street number" as qualifier. Use property P6375 if there is no item for the streetGrand Théâtre de Québec <located on street> 269, boulevard René-Lévesque Est, Québec (Québec) G1R 2B3 (French)-
countryP17Itemcountry: sovereign state of this item; don't use on humansTolhuisgarden <country> Netherlands-

Identification[edit]

Title ID Data type Description Examples Inverse
Flanders Arts Institute venue IDP3820External identifierFlanders Arts Institute and data.kunsten.be: identifier of a venue in the Flanders Arts Institute database for performing artsRoyal Flemish Theatre <Flanders Arts Institute venue ID> 131036-

Open issues:

  • Complete the table with the relevant attributes and always refer to an example
  • What type of subclasses are used for venues in performing arts? According to the definition of venue, it defines a building, which is made by men hand.
  • Make sure that you create separate items for the venue and the organization (example: Schauspielhaus Zürich (Q675022) is operated by Schauspielhaus Zürich (Q40313234)).

Mapping Infobox Templates[edit]

Several Wikipedias, such as the English or Portuguese Wikipedia, are using a very general Infobox venue template to describe sports and cultural venues alike. The French and a few other Wikipedias are using a template for cultural venues that covers both theatre and music venues (Infobox Salle de spectacle). Other Wikipedias, such as the German, Spanish, Russian and Italian Wikipedias, are using a specific template for theatre venues (Infobox theatre); they may not have specific templates for music venues (e.g. German, Spanish, Italian Wikipedias).

Some of them contain a mix of parameters, some pertaining to a building, and some to an organization.

Infobox templates used to describe venues in general[edit]

Wikidata en pt
name
nickname
native_name
native_name_lang
fullname
former names
logo_image
logo_caption
image
image_size
image_alt
caption
pushpin_map
pushpin_mapsize
pushpin_map_caption
pushpin_label_position
pushpin_relief
located at street address (P6375) address: street address
located in the administrative territorial entity (P131) address: city
country (P17) address: country
location
coordinate location (P625) coordinates
elevation
type
genre
broke_ground
built
date of official opening (P1619) opened
renovated
expanded
date of official closure (P3999) closed
demolished
owned by (P127) owner
operator (P137) operator
surface
scoreboard
production
cost
architect (P84) architect
builder
project manager
structural engineer
services engineer
general contractor
main contractors
seating type
maximum capacity (P1083) capacity
suites
record attendance
dimensions
field shape
acreage
volume
tenants
embedded
official website (P856) website
public transit

Infobox templates used to describe performing arts venues[edit]

Wikidata de (theatre) es (theatre) fr (theatre & music) it (theatre) ru (theatre)